United States: Essays, 1952-1992 – Gore Vidal

1960s: Days of Rage

United States collects 114 essays written by Gore Vidal over the last four decades. Despite the reproduction of Jasper Johns’s forty-eight-star flag on the dust jacket, less than half of them are about politics. The rest describe books, places, and people he has known. Johnson’s Dictionary had hard words for the essay: ‘an irregular indigested piece; not a regular and orderly composition.’ Vidal serves the form better than that. He found his range when Eisenhower was president, and stuck to it. Most of these pieces are anchored to a discussion of some book. If it is a book he likes, Vidal provides a summary that is both detailed and interesting. He favors a bright, staccato prose, which draws its variety from the length of its sentences. Short fragments. Good for facts. These will be followed by long, elliptical tendrils of analysis or appraisal, occasionally wise, often witty, and…

View original post 235 more words

A Prince of Darkness and Election Fraudits

Flowers For Socrates

by IRENE FOWLER, Contributor

 

Democracy is like the sun;
it reaches and touches every individual.

– Irene Fowler

__________________________

Good morning everyone and welcome.

Whatever your preferred flavour of life is – sweet, savoury, spicy or somethin’ else, welcome to the melting pot. I am on West African time, so ‘servez-vous.’

Even though we are helpless to change things on a macro scale, we can in our own small ways, align with love and the positive. As we contribute our quota, we are building towards a critical mass which can force change/s for good.
__________________________

Something has fundamentally changed in the world when one of the leaders of the European Union mentions the American president among the top threats to European unity, along with Russian aggression, radical Islamic terrorism, and civil wars in the Middle East. On Tuesday, European Council President Donald Tusk did just that.” 

View original post 460 more words

The Hospital Occupation That Changed Public Health Care

1960s: Days of Rage


On July 14, 1970, members of the Young Lords occupied Lincoln Hospital in the South Bronx — known locally as the ‘Butcher Shop.’ A group of activists, many of them in their late teens and 20s, barricaded themselves inside the facility, demanding safer and more accessible health care for the community. Originally a Chicago-based street gang, the Young Lords turned to community activism, inspired by the Black Panthers and by student movements in Puerto Rico. A Young Lords chapter in New York soon formed, agitating for community control of institutions and land, as well as self-determination for Puerto Rico. Their tactics included direct action and occupations that highlighted institutional failures. Through archival footage, re-enactments and contemporary interviews, the documentary above shines a light on the Young Lords’ resistance movement and their fight for human rights. The dramatic takeover of Lincoln Hospital produced one of the first Patient’s…

View original post 77 more words

PBS: “Muhammad Ali” Four-part documentary series

1960s: Days of Rage

Like many aspects of Muhammad Ali’s life, this photo of him defeating Sonny Liston in 1965 transcended boxing. A new documentary assesses Ali’s impact inside the ring and out.

“There it was, legendary frame by legendary frame, frozen in time — continual snapshots when gladiators armed with red gloves and the power to persuade either championed the twisted hearts of this country, or drew the endless ire of it. And to think: This film reel of immortals was rescued from being dispatched to a landfill. If not for one Pennsylvania archivist, 38 reels of 16mm color reversal film of the best, most brutal boxing match in history would’ve landed in a sea of rubbish. Untouched, unseen, unfulfilled. Years earlier, Janice Allen salvaged a number of boxes tossed in a dumpster outside a film lab that had recently shut up shop for good. One box had ‘Ali’ written on it. She…

View original post 336 more words

The Tangier Diaries, 1962-1979 – John Hopkins

1960s: Days of Rage


“A writer’s perfunctory yet absorbing diary of his life in Tangiers. Lifelong ÇmigrÇ and novelist Hopkins (The Flight of the Pelican, 1984 etc.), fresh out of Princeton and convinced that Wall Street and the professions were not for him, jaunted around South America and Europe before finally pitching up in Morocco. There, on and off for 17 years, he pursued with gathering success his literary ambitions. Cheap, exotic, permissive, Morocco (especially Tangiers) was one of the places to be in the early ’60s, especially for writers and artists and American millionaires. Now it all seems almost mythic, a great, outlandish American Bloomsbury. Hopkins delivers all the expected goodies and more: the requisite desert meditations (‘This is what the desert does. It leaves you with a terrible nostalgia for the purity you left behind. That purity was you”), the kef-censed evenings in the kasbah, the celebrity sightings. Beyond the…

View original post 161 more words

Albert Camus on the Responsibility of the Artist: To “Create Dangerously” (1957)

1960s: Days of Rage


“Literary statements about the nature and purpose of art constitute a genre unto themselves, the ars poetica, an antique form going back at least as far as Roman poet Horace. The 19th century poles of the debate are sometimes represented by the dueling notions of Percy Shelley — who claimed that poets are the ‘unacknowledged legislators of the world’ — and Oscar Wilde, who famously proclaimed, ‘all art is quite useless.’ These two statements conveniently describe a conflict between art that involves itself in the struggles of the world, and art that is involved only with itself. In the mid-twentieth century, Albert Camus put the question somewhat differently in a 1957 speech entitled ‘Create Dangerously:Of what could art speak, indeed? If it adapts itself to what the majority of our society wants, art will be a meaningless recreation. If it blindly rejects that society, if…

View original post 271 more words

Folk baroque

1960s: Days of Rage


Folk baroque or baroque guitar, and also sometimes called chamber folk, is a distinctive and influential guitar fingerstyle developed in Britain in the 1960s, which combined elements of American folk, blues, jazz and ragtime with British folk music to produce a new and elaborate form of accompaniment. It has been highly important in folk music, folk rock and British folk rock playing, particularly in Britain, Ireland, North America and France. Particularly notable in the folk baroque style was the adoption of DADGAD tuning, which gave a form of suspended-fourth D chord, usefully neither major or minor, which could be employed as the basis for modal-based folk songs. It is uncertain who first developed this tuning, as both Davy Graham and Martin Carthy attributed it to each other, but it has been speculated that Graham may have acquired it from the oud while visiting north Africa…

View original post 272 more words

JACOBIN No.29 / Spring 2018: 1968

1960s: Days of Rage


“Between us we can change this rotten society. Now, put on your coat and make for the nearest cinema. Look at their deadly love-making on the screen. Isn’t it better in real life? Make up your mind to learn to love. Then, during the interval, when the first advertisements come on, pick up your tomatoes or, if you prefer, your eggs, and chuck them. Then get out into the street, and peel off all the latest government proclamations until underneath you discover the message of the days of May and June. Stay awhile in the street. Look at the passers-by and remind yourself: the last word has not yet been said. Then act. Act with others, not for them. Make the revolution here and now. It is your own. C’est pour toi que tu fais la révolution. — Daniel and Gabriel Cohn-Bendit, Obsolete Communism: The Left-Wing Alternative
The Tragedy…

View original post 40 more words

Balanchine, the Teacher: ‘I Pushed Everybody’

1960s: Days of Rage


“The setting is a ballet class, and the year is 1974. George Balanchine throws up his arms in exasperation at the sight of a dancer executing a step incorrectly at the barre. We may not be able to see her, and what she’s doing wrong, but we feel how hard Balanchine is taking it. It’s not just his words — ‘that’s bad’ — but the punctuation of his body, emphatic, agile, alive. His hands slap his thighs. He raises an arm like a stiff branch to show how far a leg should be raised. It’s not high; it’s parallel to the floor. … The new film ‘In Balanchine’s Classroom,’ directed by Connie Hochman, focuses on the teaching of the groundbreaking choreographer — and how it instilled his dances at New York City Ballet with articulate, musical brilliance. It’s both enthralling and heartbreaking. To love Balanchine is to love this film…

View original post 284 more words

Pathways and Daffodils

Flowers For Socrates

by IRENE FOWLER, Contributor

 Lily-rose-jasmine, scented air
Paradise to gain, much to dare

____________________________


Good morning everyone and welcome.

Whatever your preferred flavour of life is – sweet, savoury, spicy or somethin’ else, welcome to the melting pot. I am on West African time, so ‘servez-vous.’

Even though we are helpless to change things on a macro scale, we can in our own small ways, align with love and the positive. As we contribute our quota, we are building towards a critical mass which can force change/s for good.
____________________________

Whilst trying to forge ahead with our individual lives, as indeed we must, we are often weighted down with past baggage, hindered by present constrictions, and fearful of future outcomes. In fact, the business of staying alive and living (surviving and thriving), may sometimes appear to be extraordinarily daunting. These instances may be akin to a situation where a non-mountaineer…

View original post 492 more words